No Direction Home

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Andrew McGeever
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No Direction Home

Post by Andrew McGeever » Tue Sep 27, 2005 2:52 am

Yes, I watched (and taped) Scorsese's film tonight. The second part is tomorrow.
Scorsese never interviewed his subject. At the same time, his subject was writing the first volume of "Chronicles".
For me, it worked brilliantly: Dylan is articulate, looks in good shape, and the vast extent of his genius is delineated with delicate subtelty.
After the programme, I taped another (on BBC4) and saw Julie Felix introducing Leonard Cohen, who sang "The Stranger Song"(1967).
There's been a whole load of hype in the "quality" Brit-press in the last week about Martin's film. Is this a stamp to post another Nobel nomination for Bob Dylan? (The last was in 1997).
Andrew.
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lizzytysh
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Post by lizzytysh » Tue Sep 27, 2005 6:20 am

Dear Andrew ~

I've just finished watching the first half of that PHENOMENAL documentary. Second half tomorrow night.

This is the kind of program I want to see done on Leonard. I wonder if "I'm Your Man" comes anywhere close.

It's good to see the respect John Hammond had in the industry.
well, I could go on and on, but I have a 45-mile drive home, it's 11 PM, and I have to get up at 4 AM.

Goodnite!

~ Lizzt
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davideo
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no direction home

Post by davideo » Tue Sep 27, 2005 9:20 am

It's over for tonight.
I needed that!
I've needed that for thirty years!
Good to hear it from the horse's mouth, and others'.
I love Bob as much as ever.
There's more that just a little Bob Dylan in each of us.
It'd be a shitty world without the likes of this man- innocent, persistent, honest when it counts- his own person and willing to share.
Just plain Gifted.
Nothing real can be threatened.
Nothing unreal exists.
Herein lies the peace of God.
"A Course in Miracles"
http://members.shaw.ca/clatwood/
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lizzytysh
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Post by lizzytysh » Tue Sep 27, 2005 12:34 pm

Davideo ~

Thanks for going into some of the emotional responses to it. Absolutely to all you've said! It revibratizes how I've felt about Bob throughout the years. I kept thinking throughout it how the trailer comment is so true about the Bob Dylan you thought you knew, etc. So much how he came to be, internally and externally, in this!

Another thing [for me] is how good he looks~! How our tastes change as we grow older. Amazed at how young he looked when he was young :lol: ! He looked good then, too, yet my memories had him more 'craggy' looking then, somehow, than he really was. The grit was there, but in his voice. Oh, I'd explain all this more, but I'll be late if I do :lol: . I'll let it go at that, at least for now.

Later. It'll be worth another 45 miles each way to see the second part :D .

~ Lizzy
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tomsakic
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Post by tomsakic » Tue Sep 27, 2005 3:44 pm

Just this morning realised that the Bob Dylan Scrapbook has been promptly translated and published in Croatian language, and that Scorsese's movei will be out on DVD next week - Croatian translation of Chronicles is also set to appear along with it. Looking at that unbelievable scrapbook - it is sad that Leonard will never get something like it. And of course that Dylan's movie is great - it is Martin Scorsese movie after all, isn't it? And Scorsese is far better director than some D.A. Pennebaker and his awfull imitation of "cinema verite".
This post isn't much related with Dylan, true, I am not such fan, I will of course see the movie as I am big fan of Martin Scorsese, but I can't not to compare the treatment Dylan gets with that of Leonard... :cry:
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tom.d.stiller
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Re: No Direction Home

Post by tom.d.stiller » Tue Sep 27, 2005 3:47 pm

Andrew McGeever wrote:Is this a stamp to post another Nobel nomination for Bob Dylan? (The last was in 1997).
Dear Andrew, this isn't right. Bob Dylan was first nominated in 1997, but has been nominated every year after - at least until 2002. Look here...

However, as the Nobel Foundation cared to point out: "According to the Statutes of the Nobel Foundation, information about the nominations is not to be disclosed, publicly or privately, for a period of fifty years. The restriction not only concerns the nominees and nominators, but also investigations and opinions in the awarding of a prize. Nomination information older than fifty years is public." (http://nobelprize.org/help/faq/#2)

So all our information, including the 1997 nomination, is unofficial. :(

tom

PS: I'd love BD to receive the Nobel Prize, as he's one of the major poetic voices of the past 40 years. And, davideo, I'd love if there were "more than just a little Bob Dylan" in me, but I'm afraid there's not much indicating there is...
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lizzytysh
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Post by lizzytysh » Tue Sep 27, 2005 5:15 pm

The program footage of Joan Baez reminded me once again of my immense respect for her. She has maintained her integrity to a sterling degree.

She was right there with Cindy Sheehan in Washington, too.

It would seem that the guy who says he feels he was the one who actually made Dylan 'popular' [well known] ~ vs. our John Hammond ~ had a point, given all the album covers they showed, etc. He sure was passed over a lot, in any case. No 'pretty voice' here :lol: !

I'm going to order the DVD ~ we got the phone number off the screen at the end of Part I. There's really a lot of material in this film. Very worth the expenditure.

~ Lizzy
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Post by LaurieAK » Tue Sep 27, 2005 8:49 pm

I really enjoyed the first half of this Dylan documentary.

The thing that stood out to me was how incredibly Young he was at the start.
It turned into a bit of an esoteric pondering for me.
Some folks just seem to be anomalies. He is one. His unlikely devotion to Guthrie's music seemed to be his destiny. And in turn it became a destiny that effected an entire nation, when the timing was perfect, as if by design. I think he is a major touchstone of change of not just a generation, but an icon of change for everyone who has come after his art came to fruition, whether they can connect the dots or not.

He is a rare, "big picture" soul. I think Leonard is too.

Laurie
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lizzytysh
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Post by lizzytysh » Tue Sep 27, 2005 8:58 pm

When he responded to a question, answering that, yes, he was "20," you could've knocked me over with a feather ~ for the same reasons you've outlined. And his 'crash course' in the elements he needed [3-4 months vs. a year or so] to make his mark. His linking to Guthrie the way he did was his "old soul" destiny, indeed.

Now, we need to hunt down Scorcese to do a film on Leonard.
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Ali
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Post by Ali » Wed Sep 28, 2005 12:39 am

Hmm?? Was it just me or did he seem more at ease with himself than in any other interview? Great documentary I thought (missed part one though :cry:) also Joan Baez looked fabulous.
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lizzytysh
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Post by lizzytysh » Wed Sep 28, 2005 12:41 am

He sure seems at ease to me, Ali. Joan sure does look fabulous! I have so much respect for her. No one can ever say she 'sold out.'
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margaret
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Post by margaret » Wed Sep 28, 2005 12:57 am

Joan was great when I saw her live last year. If she tours again soon I'll be there.
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Joe Way
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Post by Joe Way » Wed Sep 28, 2005 5:33 pm

I thought the 2nd part was even more extraordinary than the first.

I found it fascinating to watch the evolution of the music. For example, the first version of "Like a Rolling Stone" that they played was in triple time (waltz time). Dylan changed it to that ponderous 4/4 beat allowing his musicians to noodle around. The story that Al Kooper told about how he convinced the producer to let him play the organ was priceless. I believe the original studio version was key of C. I have a later concert version in G that has a lighter feel. I love how Dylan continuously changes the versions of his songs and apparently encourages his musicians to experiment. You can tell how important word play became also in his songwriting. Have any of you heard the recording of his poem, "Last thoughts on Woody Gutherie"?

I had forgotton that Bob Johnston produced the Highway 61 sessions. Tom, you probably know the story better than I do, but wasn't there some apparent bad blood (at least on Dylan's part) for Johnston working with Leonard? For some reason, I think that Dylan was in the studio with "Nashville Skyline" at the same time that Leonard was recording "Songs From a Room"?

Speaking of Highway 61 makes me think of Squidgy as we once had a great conversation about how U. S. Highway 61 runs down from the Canadian border near Thunder Bay, Ontario not too far from Hibbing-it becomes the great river road between Minnesota and Wisconsin while heading south to New Orleans. It also is the highway out of New Orleans that many of the old blues men used and Dylan spent some time down there-hence the Highway 61 revisited.


Without Dylan, do you think that Leonard would have turned to songwriting and tried to make a living at it?

Joe
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Post by jurica » Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:11 pm

Joe Way wrote:Speaking of Highway 61 makes me think of Squidgy as we once had a great conversation about how U. S. Highway 61 runs down from the Canadian border near Thunder Bay, Ontario not too far from Hibbing-it becomes the great river road between Minnesota and Wisconsin while heading south to New Orleans. It also is the highway out of New Orleans that many of the old blues men used and Dylan spent some time down there-hence the Highway 61 revisited.


Without Dylan, do you think that Leonard would have turned to songwriting and tried to make a living at it?
Dylan was born in Duluth, Minnesota, and Highway 61 runs through his hometown. i think he felt about that highway as his way into the open wide world where everything happens (from Story of Isaac in the first verse to the end of the world in the last), and as his connection with the roots of his music - Delta blues.

the song was never realy popular among his fans, but it is one of my favorites. i feel a LOT of emotions and nostalgia in it. like in Blind Willie McTell, which is also among my favorites though Dylan himself was never pleased with how that one came out.

and would there be Leonard Cohen that we all love if there wasn't Dylan? i think eventualy yes. Dylan was not the only poet with a guitar around. just the best one in America. what i wonder is would LC's songs sound different in any way if there was no Bob Dylan?
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margaret
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Post by margaret » Wed Sep 28, 2005 10:50 pm

what i wonder is would LC's songs sound different in any way if there was no Bob Dylan?

I don't think Leonard's songs would have been any different. He had been playing guitar a long time and developing his own style. Dylan's language and style were more "of the street and the masses", and Leonard's style had developed from his background and his study of serious literature and poetry. Perhaps seeing Dylan's success contributed to Cohen's decision to branch out and become a songwriter/singer.
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