CONCERT REPORT: Glastonbury (June 29)

Canada and Europe (May 11 - August 3, 2008). Concert reports, set lists, photos, media coverage, multimedia links, recollections...
Tempted
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:14 pm

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Tempted » Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:42 pm

I have never written on a forum such as this before and probably will never again, and I have never considered myself a Leonard Cohen fan, but I just had to say this. I was one of two cameramen allowed into the pit to film Leonard Cohen's Pyramid stage performance at Glastonbury, June 29th, 2008. My role was to allow the thousands of people who aren't in the first ten rows to see the performers, displayed on the massive LED screens right and left of stage.

I can happily say that this gig was one of the most spellbinding moments of my career. I held a close up shot of Leonard throughout the performance, in order to convey the intimacy to the back of the crowd, and I was there singing Hallelujah with all my soul along with everyone onstage and off; crew, crowd, everyone.

But the reason why I feel so privileged to have been there that night was because, I was that cameraman standing at the Webb sisters feet, and hearing them sing and seeing them made me feel that I had risen up to heaven......

Hallelujah


Simply beautiful......

......Beautiful design, beautiful concept, beautiful music, beautiful lyrics, beautiful man.....

Leonard Cohen you are the most sublime genius
Jojio
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:58 pm

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Jojio » Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:56 pm

Pope wrote:I like many others here looked forward to Glastonbury and Cohen on tv as the closest we could get to a live performance. Nothing doing, Cohen selfishly misread his fans. Done so World Tour dvd sells better - well here's one fan who won't be buying one.
g.
This looks like a letter straight from the pages of Viz magazine!
Jojio
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:58 pm

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Jojio » Thu Jul 03, 2008 6:07 pm

thethirdman wrote:
Jojio wrote:
thethirdman wrote:i was at the show in Manchester on the 18th and a few rows from the front at Glastonbury, and as good as the Manchester show was glasto was simply amazing!so obviously i was as disappointed as every one else to get back to my sky+ and see that he wasn't recorded, i still just put it down to two things either: he is bringing a dvd out and doesn't want to hurt the sales, cynical maybe but hey capitalism won communism lost or he wasn't sure how he would be received. i for one was shocked that he was on the pyramid stage given that wonderful as we all think he is, he is a bit like Marmite.
fortunately for all who were lucky enough to be there the performance was great and so long Marianne and hallelujah when everyone was singing along (even a girl on her mothers back who can only have been 3-5 years old) was definitely the highlight of a truly wonderful 5 days for me!

ps i went to see dylan at the m.e.n arena and he didn't even have screens and his own gig, which by the way is the worst concert i have ever been too, his voice is awful now, he was monumentally arrogant {didn't say a word to us other than saying the names of his band) and at £40-50 each for a ticket i was disgusted!
Dylan's voice has deteriorated in recent years but he has always said that he would want to perform like an old blues artist when he got older and the fact that he includes a lot of blues structured songs in his sets suggests he's doing just that. However, how can somebody who "didn't say a word" be monumentally arrogant? He's there to perform his songs, not to meet your expectations of what an "entertainer" should be doing. If you want that, go and see Neil Diamond.
for people to spend their hard earned money on concert tickets and for the performer/band to not once say: hello, nice to be here, its a pleasure to play for you, hope to see you again sometime or even just thank you after applause for a song is completely unacceptable!that's just basic common courtesy and the least an audience who were by no means disrespectful deserved.

as for his "old blues artist voice" the comedian Dave Spikey, who was at the same concert as me said that he sounded like "a cross between R2D2 and Davros!
Well, that's Dave Spikey for you - about the unfunniest "comedian" I've ever seen. If you're taking your standpoint from him you're errrr, let's put this nicely, misguided and wrong.

As for Dylan's lack of banal chatter between songs I would just add that the only thing that really spoilt the Cohen show for me was the continual repitition of band intros .... every bloomin' solo was followed by an intro. After a while this became not only tedious but rather embarrassing for both audience and musician.
mandyb
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 01, 2008 10:57 am

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by mandyb » Thu Jul 03, 2008 7:43 pm

oh dear....I must have been blinded by Leonard's music on the 20th in Manchester...I honestly didn't see any staff running around trying to stop people taking photo's......I got about 4/5 photos but my camera was poor to say the least. I am grateful to those who have posted stuff on youtube...that is a great bonus..

I was told by a friend they would prevent you taking photo's at Manchester but there was quite a few taken where I sat even after Leonard's first break..Row X in the stalls...maybe they couldn't reach us!!! heheheh
User avatar
Neophyte
Posts: 101
Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 4:39 am
Location: Wisconsin

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Neophyte » Thu Jul 03, 2008 9:11 pm

Tempted wrote:I have never written on a forum such as this before and probably will never again, and I have never considered myself a Leonard Cohen fan, but I just had to say this. I was one of two cameramen allowed into the pit to film Leonard Cohen's Pyramid stage performance at Glastonbury, June 29th, 2008. My role was to allow the thousands of people who aren't in the first ten rows to see the performers, displayed on the massive LED screens right and left of stage.

I can happily say that this gig was one of the most spellbinding moments of my career. I held a close up shot of Leonard throughout the performance, in order to convey the intimacy to the back of the crowd, and I was there singing Hallelujah with all my soul along with everyone onstage and off; crew, crowd, everyone.

But the reason why I feel so privileged to have been there that night was because, I was that cameraman standing at the Webb sisters feet, and hearing them sing and seeing them made me feel that I had risen up to heaven......

Hallelujah


Simply beautiful......

......Beautiful design, beautiful concept, beautiful music, beautiful lyrics, beautiful man.....

Leonard Cohen you are the most sublime genius
So very sweet of you to share your experience with us die-hard fans!! It means a lot coming from someone who has seen so many! And I find it very easy to believe as I was amongst the enthralled in Montreal!!
Hallelujah!!!
seanmiller
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 5:18 pm

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by seanmiller » Thu Jul 03, 2008 10:02 pm

Thanks "tempted" :-)

I only joined the forum too after the gig on Sunday, having enjoyed Leonard Cohen's music for years but never having been as "enthused" as I am at present... I knew he was good, not just HOW good (!)

Now seriously considering, if I can do some black market racketeering (lol) to subsidise it going to the Big Chill to see him again in August.

Sean
User avatar
tinderella
Posts: 1510
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:48 pm
Location: Dublin Ireland

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by tinderella » Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:14 am

Absolutely beautifully written Tempted. Glad you shared that with us. I was at 2 of his events in Dublin. I love the man. And i just worked my way up to the side of the stage for the last half hour of show and Leonard was only feet away from me. Just to be in his presence was an honour.
confetti
Posts: 413
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 11:59 pm
Location: northern ireland
Contact:

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by confetti » Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:19 am

:D
"I needed so much, to have nothing to touch - I've always been greedy that way"
Ziyad
Posts: 50
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2008 6:19 pm

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Ziyad » Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:05 pm

Random Leonard Thoughts

Prologue – Where do I start, having seen Lenny’s first and third nights at Manchester and his Glastonbury gig as well? So many random Lenny thoughts…

Manchester Tuesday 17th June – What a special day, an exciting trip from London to see the great man’s first UK gig after so many years, with the possibility of getting into the soundcheck as well (and god forbid a chance of getting to meet, in my humble opinion, the world’s greatest living person). It was enough to turn a 50 year old’s knees to teenage jelly. Train from London was late but we managed to catch the last 3 songs of the soundcheck. As we walked into the Opera House, I could hear Leonard singing Anthem loud and clear. The three of us (Marc and Sarah both Leonard virgins) sat in the 8th row, with I think 4 others in the audience. First thoughts, the lights were on, and with eyes closed it was the LC I’ve remembered in my daydreams for the last 15 years, but open my eyes and it was a very frail man in his 70s who reminded me of my elderly mother. I frequently go to gigs, and have never before cried watching Lenny or anyone else, but this is different. He’s alive, his voice is wonderful, and he’s singing for me. I was shaking. I didn’t want to spoil the soundcheck for the band by wailing, I’d held it together when my dad died and I cajoled myself to just keep my emotions in check. So Long Marianne needed help (with the tune), but otherwise, this was heaven. By Democracy Lenny had shaved 30 years from his age and was now younger than me.

Before I knew it Lenny had left the stage and came into the auditorium with Sharon Robinson and A N Other (his manager/minder?). Nervously we went over. What can you say to the only person you’ve spent 35 years dreaming of meeting? Especially given Leonard’s nervousness with touring and how it’s taken its toll on him over the years. It was unfair to try to engage him in a conversation – Leonard would be too kind to betray any discomfort, though I suspect Sharon would have metaphorically flexed her muscles! At any rate, a humble “It’s an honour to meet you Mr Cohen. And could you please write a message to my 10 and 12 year old daughters who will be seeing you at the O2 in London”. Luckily I had a pre-version of the Guardian’s Leonard Cohen booklet for their Great Lyricists series (published on the eve of his Glastonbury appearance). And Lenny signed the following under his picture:
“to Mia and Ines
warm regards
Leonard Cohen
Manchester
2008”
Interestingly, the old dog still has his powers. Marc and my kids got a warm regards from Lenny, whereas Sarah’s kids got a love – the romantic roué has not changed his spots.

2 hours later and Lenny entranced a mesmerised Opera House. You know the songlist and you’ve read the reviews. The concert versions were all better than the soundcheck. No tears for me but Dance Me to the End of Love, Hey That’s No Way to Say Goodbye, Suzanne and Hallelujah had some weeping in the aisles. I was very impressed with the (relatively) new songs especially the recitation of A Thousand Kisses Deep, as well as the band (especially Javier on all types of guitars and Dino on the “instrument of wind”). Pretty much perfect, and I swear Lenny was back in his 30s.

But still there are a few very minor teeny weeny complaints:
• I wanted Leonard to talk more, we were restricted to an initial intro, his funny reference to the last 15 years with his infamous list of chemical enhancers from Prozac to Ritalin, and his conversation about the effect of alcohol with Sharon. 3 hours of Lenny talking would be almost as pleasurable as a show. I remember the constant barrage of tales about Janis, Nico etc when I saw him for the first time touring New Skin back in 1974 at the Royal Albert Hall, and also at the RAH in I think 1976 when he finished his double digit 1 hour + of encores with a soliloquy of thanks to the audience for being there, to the people outside for not being there, to the grass for being green, the sun and moon for shining, the sky etc
• Nothing from Songs of Love and Hate, probably the best album ever made by anyone. Not even Famous Blue Raincoat - which would have brought back memories of my first visit to NY when my long suffering wife walked up and down Clinton Street with me, just because we could. I would have even settled for Chelsea Hotel #2, having spent that particular trip staying at the Chelsea (you get the theme of that holiday in NY!)
• Slightly too many band intros and solos which at worst shows Lenny’s modesty and his generosity of spirit (especially when he stood perfectly still with fedora on chest as a mark of respect to the soloist) – by the 3rd night he’d honed the act to the perfect number of intros and any hint of a cheesy solo was removed
• Some of the old songs, Bird On A Wire, Hey That’s No Way To Say Goodbye and So Long Marianne lost a tiny bit of their angelic melodies, especially at the beginning

And still the pleasure of seats in the middle of the front row for Thursday to await…

Manchester Thursday 19th June – What a special day again – as far as I was concerned I would happily be an extra in Lenny’s Groundhog Day (or even more impertinently Leonard could be part of my own Groundhog Day). Another exciting and excitable train trip from London. I forgot to buy a bunch of flowers for Leonard but Marc’s brother (who joined us with Marc’s old friend and her parents - her dad an old time fan like myself) managed to get 5 red roses from our hotel. I resolved to save my rose for the second encore, but the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry… In a blinding bit of inspiration during Everybody Knows, as LC sang “and a long stem rose” my rose took a life of its own and landed at the maestro’s feet. I couldn’t have choreographed it better as Lenny picked up my rose (technically Marc’s brother’s or the hotel’s rose) and he finished the song clutching the flower – perhaps the perfect choreography would have involved LC inviting me on stage but that’s another daydream…

As the evening passed us by, Leonard had accepted 4 roses from us and Charlie Webb (she should really be called Hattie) had placed a rose in her hair (she should have placed it in her teeth like one more thin gypsy thief) – a present from the brothers to the sublime Webb sisters.

As for the music the haunting Sisters of Mercy replaced That Don’t Make It Junk and with me shouting for Last Year’s Man and then Famous Blue Raincoat, I was convinced LC would sing my favourite lines in pop music (“thanks for the trouble you took from her eyes, I thought it was there for good so I didn’t try”). After I Tried To Leave You, the roadie tried to bring on the double bass – Leonard, god bless his heart, seemed to have agreed to bring Jane back to life, but it was not to be as Roscoe turned the roadie away. No complaints as we were treated to an angelic Whither Thou Goest. I was emotionally exhausted, I can’t begin to imagine what the 73 year old genius must have been feeling. But still no tears…

And Glastonbury still to come, and you never know, Leonard may decide to play some Love And Hate – perhaps Avalanche so wonderfully resurrected by Nick Cave in the early 80’s just when the music biz was in danger of forgetting Lenny – or maybe Joan of Arc or Last Year’s Man (very long shots these). Hell I’d even settle for Dress Rehearsal Rag, Diamonds in the Mine, Love Calls You by Your Name or Sing Another Song Boys – failing that, fingers crossed, Famous Blue Raincoat will do.

Glastonbury Sunday 29th June – What a special weekend. I’m a late convert (as in this millennium) to Glastonbury but at the risk of sounding like an old hippy, there is no stage more magical than the Pyramid stage for the last 2 acts of the evening as the sun sets and the pleasures of the dark await. And Leonard as the dusk settles at the end of Glasto, I couldn’t have planned it better.

Glastonbury is full of personal moments, special private moments shared with friends and some musical ones shared with the lucky ones at a particular gig. Usually each Glastonbury has one moment – only 1 per year is allowed (last year it lasted for more than 5 hours with the Africa Express collective on the Park Stage, in 2003 it was Radiohead at the Pyramid singing Karma Police – and in both of those cases that moment was even more powerful for me given my low expectations beforehand). Once a decade, if we’re lucky, we get the Glastonbury moment. The last one I’m told was Radiohead in 1997. On a personal level, my expectations were sky high for LC, but at a Glastonbury level, I was prepared for a major embarrassment. Of course I was worried, much the same as a nervous father would be if his child was headlining for the first time.

So many questions to worry about. Would the audience respect Lenny? Would they understand him? Would many of them have heard of him? Would they bother to turn up? Would they like what they saw? But despite all of that, it had to be the perfect way to end the perfect musical extravaganza. Imagine Glastonbury, and Leonard. All of my Christmases, Hanukkahs and Eids had come early. It goes without saying that Lenny did not disappoint. But incredibly, neither did the audience. Glastonbury is white indy rock, it’s between 15 and 35 years old, it’s trance, it’s the latest trend. It’s not meant to be about your grandfather shuffling on stage (OK in my case, my father). As Sarah’s partner said, Glastonbury is between a rock and a dance place. Even in my wildest dreams that is not Lenny.

To prepare for Mr Cohen, Marc and I went to see Neil Diamond in the usual Sunday afternoon novelty spot (last year it was Shirley Bassey, previously Brian Wilson). This is the jokey sing-along slot – Sweet Caroline and I’m A Believer fitted the bill. The Pyramid stage was full of people (50, 80 or 100,000 – it’s difficult to tell) and they were determined to enjoy themselves. This made me more nervous, how many less would be there for LC? Also while it’s accepted that Sunday afternoon is for the oldies (both on stage and in the audience), Sunday evening is different. Sandwiched between the heavenly Alison Goldfrapp and the bombastic (in the best sense of the word) Richard Ashcroft and The Verve, Leonard’s slot had to be earned – self-indulgent pity from the crowd was not on offer. After Neil, where the cameras kept zooming in on all the grey hairs in the crowd to everyone’s general bemusement, we decided to take in a dose of British Sea Power in the Guardian tent – Brighton’s whimsical answer to Arcade Fire was just what the doctor ordered (and I don’t mean the perverted doctor from One Of Us Cannot be Wrong or the evil doctor from Diamonds In The Mine). Back to Goldfrapp and then Lenny. We managed to get to the 6th row stage centre, our best ever slot in front of the Pyramid. Marc wondered whether the cameras would zoom in on all Semites for Lenny (as a Jew and an Arab we felt we fitted that particular bill)!

And then he came on. Incredibly, to a standing ovation. In the 20-odd times I’ve seen Leonard live over 35 years, I have never seen such a beatific smile on his face. He came on, stood back, and just smiled, and smiled and then smiled some more. And after what seemed an eternal standing ovation, as the audience started to quieten, Lenny continued to smile in what seemed like a state of wonder and amazement to me. And Glastonbury started to cheer again, with a second standing ovation – this I’d never seen before. Not for anyone. Not anywhere. Somehow, Lenny managed to reduce his set nearly in half, and the emotional effect of the show was inversely proportional. He and the band were even more deliberate than usual, LC hardly said a word but by god did he communicate with one and all. This was Glastonbury and the Pyramid stage in its full magical wonderment. And what did we get?
• A beautiful Dance Me to the End Of Love – decision made, this would be the song played at my funeral. The woman in front of me started to cry, but still no tears for me (or Marc)
• The Future followed with cheers for two dancing shuffles from LC – I only remember one such in Manchester. The song was a perfect intro to those who did not know Lenny – dark and apocalyptic. Pity that anal sex has become casual but never mind
• Ain’t No Cure For Love was a breather – genius needs to rest as well and it helps that the tune is so damn hummable
• And then we had the best versions I’ve seen this tour of Bird On A Wire, and Hey That’s No Way To Say Goodbye which needed to be restarted but as a result Lenny got the melody perfect from the first bar. Sandwiched in-between was Who By Fire which the audience reacted to like an old favourite much to my surprise
• These were followed by the first major sing-along So Long Marianne – by now we had a major success on our hands, and the song also was better than previously on this tour
• There was no stopping Lenny and the band. What followed were probably the best 3 songs in a row I’ve ever seen LC, or for that matter anyone, do. Firstly a revelatory Tower Of Song, beautifully weighted between comedy and pathos – a masterpiece that had everyone in stitches from the switching on the keyboards joke through to the doo dumb dumbs from Sharon and the sublime Webbs. Glastonbury loved it so much and gave such a loud ovation that Lenny had to give up his best punchline at the end because he couldn’t be heard above the cheering, despite waiting and waiting for it to stop
• And then Suzanne, my first favourite LC song, over the years overtaken by others, but like a first boy or girl friend still very special. I should have guessed this would be the one. After all, when my youngest daughter asked me to play my favourite song of all time on You Tube for her, my logic was that it had to be an LC song, and although I was not sure what to play, by default I landed on Suzanne (metaphorically). And Lenny did me proud and made me happy, and the opposite. Suzanne was so moving that the tears finally and unexpectedly came. Why I don’t know, but it was not for me to question why
• Life or Lenny couldn’t get any better, or so I thought. With the onset of Hallelujah, a fave but not the fave, the audience went mad. With flags flying, a fresh wind blowing and sunset descending, 100,000 joined in the Hallelujah Chorus. At this point I was like a pig in shit, my favourite artist getting the loudest sing-along ever, at the best venue in the world. I was beaming, whereas Marc besides me was having his first ever tearful moment. This Lenny sure moves in mysterious ways. Not only was this the one Glastonbury 2008 moment, this was the Glastonbury moment of the millennium – probably when he sang “I did not come all the way to Glastonbury to fool ya”. And it was Leonard. And he pronounced Glastonbury as an Englishman would – pure class. There is a god above…
• How can that be followed? Simply with Democracy and I’m Your Man, the intensity may have been turned down a notch (from eleven) but politics and humour compensated. Democracy is that unique song which manages to criticise and love its subject the USA in equal measures. And I’m Your Man was the first song played at my wedding – enough said
• And then Closing Time, not a fave but a lovely way to end the set, so I thought. My only slight concern was that it is too throw away and it was unconsciously troubling me that people would leave without the spiritual Lenny that I adore resonating in their ears and brains
• To my surprise, the band continued with Anthem. What perfect sentiments for Avalon, Glastonbury and the Pyramid stage. By slightly rejigging the order, Leonard played the perfect set. And the line “there is a crack in everything, that’s how the light gets in” is somehow full of hope for the human condition, warts and all. It resonates with Last Year’s Man “and the skylight is like skin for a drum I’ll never mend”. Ironically, I’d been driving my friends crazy the previous night riffing about cracks and light
• Surely they were finished? But still they went on despite the fact that he’d already introduced the band during Anthem. As you may gather, I love surprises and this set was full of them. I love the song First We Take Manhattan, but the chorus “I love your body and your spirit and your clothes” has always jarred with me. Why clothes Lenny? Is it meant to be ironic? At any rate that question was for another day. It’s not often you can shout “then we take Berlin” as part of a 100,000 strong chorus

Unbelievably, Glastonbury matched Thursday night in Manchester. It’s been 15 long years, I’ve made many new friends in that time, and they can finally see for themselves why Lenny means so much to so many of us. Somehow or other LC crossed the chasm of contradictions that make up Glastonbury and fitted in perfectly. To the point where he matched Radiohead’s legendary 1997 set – the last great Glastonbury moment. Unbelievable as it may seem, at the age of 73, Leonard Cohen is the torch bearer for Glasto’s new millennium.

London O2 Thursday 17th June and The Big Chill Sunday 3rd August – There’s still more to come. I may not have great seats for the O2 but I’m pinching myself that I will be able to experience Lenny through the eyes of my 10 and 12 year of daughters for the first time. I will be joined by my wife Dee who will be seeing him for the first time on this tour, as well as my oldest friend over from Denmark, who lost his Lenny virginity back in1974 with me, and my brother who has come to see Lenny many times in the ensuing years. Marc and his long-suffering wife will be there as well as Sarah’s partner – the last two will be hard nuts to crack, but if anyone can, Lenny can.

Between Lenny, Radiohead, Nick Cave, Massive Attack and Glastonbury, this has been the musical Indian summer of my life. Of course it really only needed Lenny. And there’s still The Big Chill after the O2 – Lenny even makes the prospect of camping enjoyable (PS we cheat at Glasto and stay in a B&B).

Epilogue – Dear Leonard, thanks for the trouble you’ve taken from all of our eyes with the soundtrack to our lives. Thank you Lenny for living at the same time as me, I am truly blessed.

Sincerely

Z. Georgis
1974 London RAH|1976 London RAH, London New Vic x 3|1979 Manchester|1985 London Hamm x 2|1988 London RAH x 3|1993 London RAH x 2|2008 Manchester x 2, Glastonbury, London O2 x 2, Big Chill, London RAH, Brighton|2009 Weybridge|2012 London Wembley|2013 London O2 x 2

"thanks for the trouble you took from her eyes, i thought it was there for good so i never tried"
User avatar
Pete
Posts: 1613
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2002 1:36 am
Location: Evesham, England

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Pete » Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:34 pm

Ziyad
Thank you so much for this report/ account. I enjoyed it very much..You shared the experiences so well...I could almost picture you there
Pete
1974: Brighton Dome 1976: Birmingham Town Hall 1993: London RAH 2008: Manchester Opera House, London O2, Matlock Bandstand, Birmingham NEC 2009: Liverpool Echo Arena 2013 Birmingham
Born With The Gift Of A G
Posts: 358
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2004 6:08 pm
Location: Manchester, England

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Born With The Gift Of A G » Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:46 pm

Some more reflections on LC at Glastonbury in today's issue of The Independent:

http://www.independent.co.uk:80/arts-en ... 59570.html

Plus some more photographs of LC on stage at Glastonbury here:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com:80/FESTIVALS/8160021

Scroll down the gallery on the right.
The first LC photo is DSC3854 (right after the snaps of Eddy Grant).
"Little lady.....I AM Kris Kristofferson....."
London: 10 & 11 May 1993; Manchester: 17, 18, 19 & 20 June 2008; Vienna: 25 September 2008; London: 17 November 2008; Paris: 26 November 2008; Manchester: 30 November 2008; Liverpool: 14 July 2009; Paris: 28 September 2012; Manchester: 31 August 2013; Leeds: 7 September 2013.
scorp
Posts: 104
Joined: Mon Jun 30, 2008 2:19 pm

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by scorp » Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:55 pm

i note the mention of 'anthem; in the indie report.

the hallelujah clip on youtube from routeoz is attracting a fair bit of attention (decent viewing numbers so far - 21,000-ish views and 99 comments in 4 days). here is anthem, in its shadow, but a beautiful song. i've always loved it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvcX5RMBwbk
UrPal
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 7:43 pm
Location: Manchester
Contact:

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by UrPal » Fri Jul 04, 2008 4:14 pm

In the last couple of days I've watched a couple of the Youtube glastonbury vids (I'd previously avoided live video clips of the tour generally) and the one of Hallelujah is spellbinding despite its technical limitations (possibly even because of them). You get more of a sense of "being there" than you would from a professional broadcast had it happened. As the camera sways around randomly amidst the enthralled crowd, staring into the sunset, panning the minute figures on stage and occasionally freeze framing the towering image of LC in close up on the big screen, the combination has a magical effect which certainly put a grin on my face.

So maybe it's a good thing the performance wasn't broadcast. It's good to see from the Youtube footage and hear so eloquently from Tempted as one of the cameramen (a very moving post, thanks Tempted) that some "proper filming" took place. Hopefully someone's stuck a recorder somewhere between the camera and the piped footage for posterity, but, if not, the Youtube stuff gives a substantial flavour to favour and savour.
Born With The Gift Of A G
Posts: 358
Joined: Fri Feb 27, 2004 6:08 pm
Location: Manchester, England

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by Born With The Gift Of A G » Fri Jul 04, 2008 5:00 pm

Ziyad,

Thanks for those interesting reflections.

Alas, you were really unlucky in Manchester, as LC performed Famous Blue Raincoat on the two nights that you were not in the venue!
"Little lady.....I AM Kris Kristofferson....."
London: 10 & 11 May 1993; Manchester: 17, 18, 19 & 20 June 2008; Vienna: 25 September 2008; London: 17 November 2008; Paris: 26 November 2008; Manchester: 30 November 2008; Liverpool: 14 July 2009; Paris: 28 September 2012; Manchester: 31 August 2013; Leeds: 7 September 2013.
UrPal
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2004 7:43 pm
Location: Manchester
Contact:

Re: Glastonbury (June 29)

Post by UrPal » Fri Jul 04, 2008 5:13 pm

Born With The Gift Of A G wrote: Plus some more photographs of LC on stage at Glastonbury here:

http://www.photoboxgallery.com:80/FESTIVALS/8160021

Scroll down the gallery on the right.
The first LC photo is DSC3854 (right after the snaps of Eddy Grant).
DSC3931's a good 'un. Cohen looks distinctly younger than his years and in flight.It seems it could make a good Jack Vettriano painting. Since he's an LC fan perhaps that's more than coincidental.
Post Reply

Return to “The Summer Tour 2008”